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Bugs

Bugs By The Numbers Counting Cards

Awesome insects decorate these eye-catching number wall cards. One side features an insect built from a number that reflects its numerical feat (e.g., 50 comprises the dragonfly because it catches and eats about 50 mosquitos each day). When the cards are flipped over, the numbers 1-25 are displayed for more counting games and simple arithmetic skills. It's an engaging and entertaining way to look at and learn about bugs and their many numbers.


Draw Learn Faces Cvr

My First Activity Book: Draw + Learn - Faces

Creative, imaginative , and engaging play for first-time artists.

An ideal activity book--with bold and bright art from Tanya Roitman--for children who have just learned to hold a crayon or pencil. First scribbles and drawings are important, precursory steps to reading and writing! Kids can complete and color all kinds of faces: boys, girls, tigers, monkeys, even ladybugs. At first, toddlers might only draw a circle for a face, not adding eyes, nose, or mouth. But in time, they will fill in the different features, from eyelashes to teeth; from curly hair to whiskers.


Cover

Stella and Charlie, Friends Forever

When former shelter dog Stella's best buddy passes away, her "mom" (who looks a lot like Bernadette Peters) goes on a journey to bring shelter dog Charlie to join their home. Stella doesn't like how Charlie hogs their mom and doesn't do things the way she's used to. But when she's hurt and needs a friend, Charlie becomes just that.


Bab Where Does Kitty Smaller Page 01

Where Does Kitty Go in the Rain?

A little girl steps out into her rainy yard in search of her missing kitten. She discovers a series of charming garden denizens on the way to finding Kitty. After celebrating the glories of a rainy day, the book ends with a heartwarming reunion between girl and cat.


Wiggles

Lines That Wiggle

Follow the glittery line that runs through this picture book and turns itself into all kinds of things: the waves above an octopus, the veins in a leaf, the wrappings curling around a mummy, and the trapping threads of a spiderweb. Candace Whitman's catchy rhyming text is brought to life by a host of creepy critters from first-time illustrator Steve Wilson.